I Have a Board Game Idea – Now What? Part 53: 3 Game Design Lessons Learned Installing Bitcoin Machines

Welcome back! I hope you all had a great week, with some time to play and/or design board games.

Back in part 45 of this series, I discussed how everyday things and situations can often be the inspiration for game designs and/or mechanics. This past week I learned that the same can apply to game design theory itself. I spent Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday of this week in Winnipeg installing bitcoin machines at a number of convenience stores. For this week’s blog post I want to look at three game design lessons I learned while installing those bitcoin machines.

Lesson 1: When working with others, learn to not sweat the stuff out of your control

The first lesson that I learned was that when you are working with and/or for people, there is always going to be things out of your control and that life will be easier if you don’t let them bother you. It most locations we installed bitcoin machines in almost as much time was spent determining where to install the machine and then preparing the site for install as we spent on actually installing it but then end result was still the same.

Lesson 2: Simple is often better and shortcuts don’t always work out

I’m a big fan of not repeating work as much as possible, but sometimes trying to take advantage of others work can end up wasting more time than it saves. This was a lesson we learned the hard way at one of our installs where we spent more time trying to figure out why an apparent shortcut wasn’t working than it would have taken to just do the work in the first place, which we ended up having to do anyway.

Lesson 3: Sometimes good enough is just that

This is a lesson that is really hard for me to remember sometimes and is especially applicable when it comes to prototyping. There were a number of sites where the install might not have been done “perfectly” but in the end, it still got the job done.

That is everything for this week. It really is amazing how often you can draw design lessons and principles from everyday situations. Have you ever discovered this? I would love to hear about your lessons learned from everyday occurrences. Until next week, happy designing.

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